Recent Entries

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 23, 2019, 10:15 p.m.

Delegation Game #8: Haunting Paris (media.mp3)

After a week of conspiracy and controversy, the fallout must be confronted. An exhausted and demoralised cast of delegates are challenged with creating some kind of policy approach to Russia, to listening to one another without going crazy, and with remaining wary at all times of former enemies, or should that be former friends? Regardless of what they planned to do in the future, there could be no denying that what they had done in the past had left Paris a haunted shell of its former self. The question remained to be answered - would it all be worth it in the end? ************ The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 21, 2019, 9:26 p.m.

Versailles #49: OTD 21st March 1919 - Hungary Sets the World on Fire (media.mp3)

A century ago today, Budapest was circling the drain of revolution, after several months of Bolshevik infiltration and grand promises, combined with mounting frustrations over President Mihaly Karolyi's consistent failings. What was to be done about the situation in Hungary? Where a population was so desperate to realise their dream of independence after four centuries under Habsburg rule? The allies had no idea, and paid Hungary barely any attention. While the peacemakers in Paris dallied, the Hungarians refused to sit still. If no one would listen then they would shock the world, and bring in only the second Bolshevik country in the world. By doing so, some Hungarians imagined that they would be able to take what was rightfully theirs. In fact, they doomed their country to suffer. Not only was Hungary now a defeated member of the Central Powers, it was now *shudder* a dangerous, Bolshevik, communist state, and had to be contained at all costs. It was a journey which began with Bela Kun, and ended with the terrible Treaty of Trianon a year later, but the story is set up here, so why not have a listen to how the forgotten vanquished power of Hungary fared in spring 1919? ********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 21, 2019, 9:39 a.m.

Versailles #48: Ten Becomes Four (media.mp3)

Check out the collaboration I did with Thom Daly, where we talked about Ireland and Brexit!  As the Paris Peace Conference welcomed back the American President and the Big Three began to entrench themselves once more into the familiar grind, it became clear that much had changed. Rather than move further away from each other, it was fortunate indeed that the allied leaders determined to double down on their efforts to foster cooperation by gathering together for a new kind of meeting – the first assembly of the Council of Four. For the next few months, the meeting synonymous with personable allied meetings, great progress and large egos would dominate the halls of Paris. Yet, in this episode, as we’ll see, the meeting had humble beginnings, and its results hardly suggested that the allies were onto a winning formula. Within this show, we will also draw on the observations provided by House, to build a picture of an allied front which contained no end of problems, but a reassuring determination nonetheless to push through these difficulties, and create a new world order on the other side which all could be proud of. It was the end of an old phase of the conference, and the beginning of something brand new…  ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 16, 2019, 8:05 p.m.

Delegation Game #7: Slaying the Tiger (media.mp3)

Episode 7 of the game analyses the events surrounding the shocking murder of Georges Clemenceau, and the return of the American President to the scene. How will the President cope with the new atmosphere of cooperation, facilitated by Roosevelt's help and support, when he couldn't stand the man? How will France cope with its shattering loss of the father of victory? What other schemes were ongoing? How did a Pole sneakily dodging between several delegations fit into proceedings? All this and much more going on in the latest episode - thankssss for listening, and thanksss especially for playing! ************* The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 14, 2019, 8:17 p.m.

Versailles #47: A Presidential Return (media.mp3)

After a month back home in the States, it was high time Woodrow Wilson returned to face the music in Paris. Exactly what tune this music would contain varied depending on whom you asked. Would Wilson find support in the leaders of the free world, or would he find only opportunists instead? What kind of impact upon the negotiations would be had by the Republican Party openly condemning his League Covenant, and insisting upon particular changes? Now that they knew he needed these four key changes to the League in order to proceed, could Georges Clemenceau, Lloyd George or Orlando be expected to be generous, or would they use their knowledge of Wilson's new weakness against him?  Regarding Wilson, he was looking a wee bit tired after that adventure back home - had it all been a waste of time? And what was up between the President and his friend the Colonel, who had truly held the fort for him while he had been gone? All these questions and so many more were in need of attention, as Wilson returned to Paris on 13th March 1919. This time, the adoring crowds would be somewhat smaller, and far less adoring... ************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 13, 2019, 9:50 p.m.

Versailles #46: First Half of March, 1919 (media.mp3)

Our largest episode yet, with an absolute legion of things to get through... it must be the first two weeks of March, 1919! Herein we see several things go down in the Council of Ten, which was still shorn of its major leaders, but which did not sit still nonetheless. The Italians get antsy over some bad Serbian behaviour, everyone gets antsy about the Germans and their army, Lloyd George returns and makes people antsy! Everyone is getting antsy, but some important work was also being done in the background, as the clock ticked down to the time when Woodrow Wilson would return, and the next phase of the Paris Peace Conference would begin... Big detailed episodes like these come to you all courtesy of the lovely patrons this podcast has, so make sure to thank them out loud right this second! And if you feel like joining the greatest group of history friends this side of audio, you know where to go and where we'll be!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 9, 2019, 9:15 p.m.

Versailles #45: William Bullitt's Mission (media.mp3)

In episode 45 of the Versailles Anniversary Project, we examine the lesser known mission of William C. Bullitt, Philadelphia aristocrat and Ivy League prodigy – at least according to his mother – who was selected to lead a top secret American delegation to Soviet Russia. Bullitt’s aims were multi-layered, and he didn’t quite understand the limits of this mission or of his own capabilities, but that won’t stop us analysing the fortunes of this very interesting statesman. Bullitt would find a Russia starving and demoralised, yet he couldn’t help but be impressed by Lenin or by the potential of this regime.  Return the food and withdraw the soldiers, Bullitt believed, and the Russian people would eject the more extreme Bolsheviks, and the West wouldn’t have to lift a finger. When Bullitt returned to Paris with these incredibly optimistic ideas, he found that everything had changed in the two and a half weeks since he had been gone. Compromise and Bolshevism were now impossible partners, and Bullitt himself had become persona non-grata in the allied consciousness. Bullitt, predictably enough, did not take this change in circumstances well… ********************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 7, 2019, 8:32 p.m.

Versailles #44: From Russia, No Love (media.mp3)

In our latest episode, we introduce you to the revolutionary wasteland that was Russia in 1919. Russia was a very confusing place at this time, because it was the subject of a lot of debate regarding that key question – should the allies launch some kind of military expedition against the Bolsheviks? That apparently simple question was complicated by the fact that the allies already had forces in different corners of Russia – 180,000 soldiers in total. How had they gotten here, why were they here, and if allied disunity over Russia’s future was the order of the day, then why hadn't they simply been allowed to return home? These questions were all difficult to answer, but as we will learn in this episode, understanding Russia is impossible unless we first get to grips with the context of 1919 Russia, and the impact which the closing months of the Great War had had on the psyche of all sides. Different factions in Russia were a dime a dozen, with Siberia, Crimean, Ukrainian, Caucasian and Far Northern fronts, among others, but the Bolsheviks had one key advantage over all of these separated foes – they were not separated, they were more united in vision and purpose than these White factions could ever claim to be. Worldwide revolution, though it had lost some of its shine, had lost none of its edge, and Lenin still very much intended to unleash this nightmare on the Western world. ************ The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 6, 2019, 11:36 a.m.

Versailles #43: Freikorps European Tour (media.mp3)

Before we delve into the Russian situation, I felt it would be beneficial, and darkly interesting, to examine what was happening in between the lands caught in the middle of the Russian and German crises. The Freikorps - disgruntled, right wing, extremist former soldiers and civilians, was exactly the wrong ingredient to help heal a fractured portion of the continent. Yet, unable to accept that their war was over, and determined to leave a mark upon the region and expand their fatherland, these men launched a campaign of utter ruthlessness for much of 1919. In this episode we examine it, as best as we can, before we set our sights firmly on Bolshevik Russia...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 2, 2019, 8 p.m.

Versailles #42: Lodge's Reservations (media.mp3)

The unofficial second parter to our examination of Woodrow Wilson's campaign to get the League of Nations approved of back home, in episode 42 we further our analysis of the different parties and their interests in the US. Who was in favour of the League, who wanted the League with some adjustments, and who was resolutely opposed to it no matter what? Where did Henry Cabot Lodge fit into this sliding scale, and when he released his Reservations document to Congress on 28th February - wherein he underline 14 problems he had with the League as it stood - what was his end goal? Did he genuinely want the League to be improved, or, for political reasons, as well as some surprising other ones, did he want it to fail completely, and never see the light of day? As an Irish historian examining such a contentious period of American history, I must say I really had a ball in this episode, and I hope you enjoy this very important detour from our Versailles narrative. The tale of Wilson's failure forms a large part of what made the Treaty of Versailles, the League of Nations and the Paris Peace Conference generally such a tragic but also such a fascinating story. It is one which requires detours like these to fully grasp, so I hope you'll join me as we jump headlong into American politics once again... ********************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on March 2, 2019, 7:08 p.m.

Delegation Game #6: Power Vacuums (media.mp3)

In the aftermath of Woodrow Wilson's exit from Paris, along with the British and Italian premiers, Clemenceau was alone to hold the fort against a resurgent and empowered German delegation. It was at that moment that an anarchist's bullet felled the Tiger, which provided an unprecedented opportunity for the Germans to fill this newly emerged power vacuum. This development, as we will discover, will have profound consequences for all the delegates going forward...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 28, 2019, 8:06 p.m.

Versailles #41: The Conference Rolls On... (media.mp3)

The last two weeks of February 1919 were awash with legions of issues, hurt feelings, long winded speeches and too many other details to possibly count. We've already seen the period from the point of view of Harold Nicolson, but was it any better of an experience for those that were actually empowered to act? Hint - not really, but to truly unpack all that this whopper episode has to offer, you must delve into it yourself!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 23, 2019, 11:26 p.m.

Versailles #40: On Tour With Harold Nicolson (media.mp3)

Spare a thought for poor old Harold Nicolson...  Mr Nicolson was a senior clerk in the British Foreign Office, and by mid-February 1919, he had already had his patience strained and his grand ambitions challenged. What lay ahead of this man once the American President departed for the US is a story not often told - the human tale. Here we hear it all and lay it bare. Between the period of 19th February and 9th March 1919, this clerk was busier than he had ever been in his life, sitting in primarily on the Greek and Czech Committees, but he was not just a busy man, he was also a disillusioned man. From consulting Nicolson's diary we can see clear as day the sheer exhaustion and frustration with the whole process begin to take root and then take over. Nicolson would lash out at Czech delegates, he would work until the sun came up, and then he would return to his desk only to find that the Foreign Office had delivered the latest boxes of papers for him to sift through. It was a job which no man could do for long, but thanks to the record which Nicolson provides, the Paris Peace Conference looms into view and we can see it for what it really was - a great idea on paper, but one which was disastrously executed. Though he was only one clerk among many, one could imagine that if an expert like Nicolson was feeling the strain, his colleagues would be feeling it too... To access the Foreign Relations of the US papers which I allude to in this episode, which provides the minutes for the Council of Ten from 15 Feb-14th March and beyond, follow this link: https://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1919Parisv04 ***************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 19, 2019, 8:45 p.m.

Versailles #39: OTD 19 Feb 1919 - Clemenceau's 'Accident' (media.mp3)

Today in history, a deranged assailant attacked the father of victory, plunging France and all of Europe into a panic, and setting off the next phase of the Paris Peace Conference...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 17, 2019, 5:49 p.m.

Versailles #38: Wrestling With Wilson (media.mp3)

Today we bravely venture to where this podcast normally steers clear - American politics. This is an essential trip though, because we must examine what happened in the US once the President returned there to present his League between 20 February and 8 March 1919. This period was spent campaigning for the new world order which Wilson so desperately wanted, and which he had fought for in person in Paris for a month. Yet, underneath the surface, and even underneath the open opposition which Republicans and Democrats alike mounted against his vision, there were other issues which Wilson had brought upon himself, and others which have since been laid at his feet regardless of fault. It was an immensely challenging time, and would ultimately come to be known the unsuccessful sequel to the Paris Peace Conference - the Treaty Fight... ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 16, 2019, 11:12 p.m.

Delegation Game #5: King Albert's Honour (media.mp3)

Oh boy, this is gonna be a good one! Episode 5 of the Delegation Game examines the aftermath of some pretty important deals which were passed, by hook or by crook, and which now challenge those present in Paris to adapt. The League of Nations Charter is the most significant of these, and in this very eventful, chunky episode, we examine the perspective of the King of the Belgians, Albert I, who was selected to chair this meeting according to the League's Charter. What's that? Woodrow Wilson wasn't selected? Well now, the President won't be happy about that will he? Within are additional alternative history developments, as the Germans shock the world by becoming accredited delegates in the Council of Ten, the French have a fit, and Dinglebrush Dinglebrushes... ************* The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 14, 2019, 6:20 p.m.

Versailles #37: OTD 14th Feb 1919 - Wilson Presents His League (media.mp3)

OTD in history 100 years ago – the League of Nations was given a covenant, stamped and signed with seals of approval from all the attending allied powers that had taken so long to reach this decision. The first two weeks of February 1919 had indeed been eventful and exhausting for many, but this here was the first piece of true, genuine progress that had been reached. It was Woodrow Wilson’s greatest achievement, and it was also the culmination of several days of very intense meetings, not to mention a mountain of paperwork. The dreamers, schemers and idealogues that had crafted the covenant all deserved mention, but on this day in history a century ago, before a packed audience in Quai d’Orsay, it was the American President and he alone that became its figurehead. Perhaps, when one looked deeper though, they could detect an element of anxiety on the part of Wilson. It had been created, but now it would have to be defended, before a suspicious and frustrated series of audiences back home in the United States. The real question then remained not how had it been done, per se, but could it be preserved after Wilson presented his baby to Congress. Spoiler – Wilson had another series of intensive weeks ahead of him. ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 12, 2019, 8:58 p.m.

Versailles #36: The Pressures of Detail and Time (media.mp3)

Gathering together on 12th February, time was of the essence, a fact which had certainly been relevant before, but which the allies had still somehow managed to essentially ignore. On this day though, the allies could not ignore the fact that Germany was a sticky situation, one which was so sticky in fact, that they would still be dealing with the core question several months later. How could the allies simultaneously do everything which the conference demanded of them while also disarming Germany, or even determining the extent to which she should be disarmed? It was an immensely difficult balancing act, yet it was very important to get it right, because if the allies didn’t disarm Germany soon, they would be swamped with expenses relating to maintaining so many soldiers at once, most of whom remained idle. A solution was supposed to be at hand, because the allies had actually worked to create a committee whose task was to devise these military terms. Yet, this committee was not able to bring anything revolutionary to the table, as the allies learned for themselves this afternoon 100 years ago. Thus, in the absence of time, and with the severe pressures weighing down on them, the allies decided that in order to give Germany the attention to detail it required, yet another committee would be required. Seriously though, this time, their committee would actually do stuff – it would be empowered to act independently of the Council of Ten and its terms for Germany could be imagined without the constant intervention of the American President, who was about to go on a considerable vacation himself. Facing into this administrative abyss, it was only sensible that some delegating be done, but it remained to be seen how, when under the pressures of detail and time, the allies would actually reach a settlement that pleased everyone and achieved their goals. They better hurry, because the next day would be all about another issue altogether – the League of Nations… ****************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 11, 2019, 8:25 p.m.

Versailles #35: An Innocent Abroad? (media.mp3)

You know the story of 'plucky little Belgium', but what about the Belgium after the war? After all they had been through, facing the might of the German Army in its initial unrelenting phase, Belgium had unquestionably been through the ringer. The question was though, what would the Belgian Foreign Minister Paul Hymans now ask for in return? The answer to that question was more incredible - read, ridiculous - than any of the allies could have imagined. As Hymans put forward his laundry list of demands, with no thought for how Belgium's neighbours would be compensated, visions of disaster were pouring forth from French strategists. Linking the Low Countries and France together was essential, it was said, if this war was to be avoided in the future. The guilty Germans would certainly try again if they sniffed any hints of weakness in the west, but what of the innocents, innocents like Belgium, who had been caught up in the midst of this Franco-German enmity, and been utterly destroyed? In return for this ordeal, Paul Hymans would demand a high price, but neither his aims nor the eerily prophetic French fears could ever be humoured to the extent that either party felt was deserved. This, of course, was the nature of the Peace Conference. Using detailed secondary sources and the actual minutes of the meetings where the Belgian Foreign Minister poured out his heart, I am privileged to be able to bring this story to you now. The allies had to listen to the naive Belgian ramble, but whether they would actually heed his warnings or accede to his demands was another story altogether, and it's a story which is well worth your time! ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 10, 2019, 7:45 p.m.

Versailles#34: On The Big Four (media.mp3)

The latest episode of the project hones in on three specific days – the 8, 9 and 10 of February 1919, as we build up to the moment when David Lloyd George and Woodrow Wilson returned home for various reasons. Both figures had a lot on their mind even before they had left, but before the American President could return home, he would at least have to face the full brunt of the paranoid French in action. At least, they seemed paranoid enough to him. The French demands, and the insistence that the Germans intended at any moment to avenge themselves upon allied divisions or weaknesses, struck Wilson as extremely far-fetched. Not for the first or for the last time, the American President was rubbed the wrong way by French severity towards Germany. Wilson didn’t understand this extreme angle of Clemenceau, but then, how could he, since America had not been invaded by its neighbour two times in as many generations. If this episode’s purpose could be summarised in four words, then it would read ‘Clemenceau’s battle with Germany.’ It was impossible, Clemenceau insisted, to leave Germany to her own devices. He was not interested in anything – not the League of Nations, not mandates, not Russia – so long as Germany remained unresolved as a problem. Clemenceau imagined that as soon as the final peace treaty was concluded, the British and Americans would leave the French to face their adversary alone. To guard against this, Clemenceau planned to drive a hard bargain in four key areas with respect to Germany – in the case of the Rhineland, the industrial Saarland, Germany’s eastern border and on the question of reparations. To Clemenceau it was vital that these matters were worked out in France’s favour, but he came up constantly against the resistance of the American President. The honeymoon period between Premier and President certainly appeared to be over, yet there was much work still to be done… *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 9, 2019, 7:59 p.m.

Delegation Game #4: Beginnings and Endings (media.mp3)

The latest instalment of the game sees everyone feeling somewhat traumatised from the massacre at the Hotel Twamley, but the show must go on! Schemes were afoot even as the Canadian Premier delivered a eulogy for his late great friend, and as the Russian delegate, Alexander Kerensky, worked to find his footing in such hostile circumstances, he found that potential allies and rivals were all around him in equal measure. Amidst the chaos and hopelessness, Kerensky would happen upon some unlikely allies, who had plans even more ambitious and grand than one could have possibly imagined... *************** The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 8, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #33: We Need To Talk About Germany (media.mp3)

In episode 33, we assess the day of 7th February, where the allies attempted to respond to what the Germans had done the previous day of 6th Feb, when the Constituent Assembly gathered in Weimar. The only problem with this allied approach was that no single man knew what exactly was happening in Germany. They were armed only with vague ideas and preconceived notions, and certainly no practical solutions. The French offered venom and wrath, the British caution, the Americans sympathy. It was impossible to decide upon the future either of Germany or the peace conference as a whole when everything seemed to be in flux, but this would not stop the allies from trying their best. As talk of Germany continued, so did plans for creating the ideal version of the League of Nations. After being presented only the previous week, a commission had gotten to work sorting through the difficulties and disagreements, which were unfortunately legion. The French, much like in the case of the German question, posed the most problems in the League discussion. But was this fair to blame the French? Could we instead be more justified in blaming the American President? Was Woodrow Wilson to blame for failing to delegate, and for viewing the creation of the League as his one truly important purpose? As we will learn here, the consensus is not present on any of these questions, because the truth is far from so simple… *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 6, 2019, 3 a.m.

Versailles #32: OTD 6th Feb 1919 - Weimar Convenes (media.mp3)

The Weimar Assembly convened on this day 100 years ago, beginning a process which contained so much high hopes and ambitions for Germany's first flirtation with democracy. Between February 1919 and June 1920, Germany would be in flux as a new constitution was developed, governments came and went, and Friedrich Ebert stood above them all... *************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 5, 2019, 8:37 p.m.

Versailles #31: Eastern Appeals (media.mp3)

What happens when the Czechs, Romanians and Yugoslavs all try to make their voices heard, as the Big Five attempt to do their best to seem interested? What you get is this episode! A deliciously detailed examination of each of the cases made by the individual national leaders, in addition to a curious detour where we look at maps could be fudged to suit an argument! All this and more in your latest episode of the Versailles Anniversary Project! *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 3, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #30: Not Yet Lost (media.mp3)

Poland's experience at the Paris Peace Conference contained its fair share of ups and downs, and nowhere was this more apparent in the early phases of the conference when its case was first presented. Poland was facing into a power vacuum and with that came great opportunities, but also grave challenges. How could Poland balance the rivalry of its major figures, Paderewski, Pilsudski and Dmowski? How could Poles balance the rivalry of its neighbours? Could Poland push back Bolshevism? Could Europe be persuaded to see things Poland's way, or was there little chance of Poland ever getting what it wanted, so long as people like David Lloyd George remained so utterly opposed to the realisation of her national ambition? Have a listen here to find out all these answers, and be introduced to the Polish case like never before... *************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Feb. 2, 2019, 5:57 p.m.

Delegation Game #3: Creators & Killers (media.mp3)

As the Hotel Twamley fills with guests, nobody could have imagined what happened next. A combination of factors, certainly not aided by the strong drink on tap, led to an explosion the likes of which Paris had never seen before, or imagined possible. The consequences would be fatal, but also had the effect of changing the narrative, and making compromise more palatable to some of the more stubborn delegates. From the most tragic of events did the greatest triumphs seem to emerge... ********* The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 30, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #29: OTD 30th Jan 1919 - An Empire In All But Name (media.mp3)

VERSAILLES_EPISODE_29_OUT_NOW! On this day 100 years ago, the world was getting to grips with the concept of mandates, also known as Empire 2.0. Several different opinions existed regarding the concept, but something which was becoming increasingly obvious was that Woodrow Wilson wanted to wait before defining it, until the League of Nations was good and ready, David Lloyd George wanted to get on with things and at least make provisional decisions, and Georges Clemenceau sat awkwardly in the middle. Everyone wanted on the one hand to give their loud approval of the concept, while at the same time demonstrating why mandates couldn’t possibly apply to them. New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, France – everyone had ideas about what a mandate would look like and why direct annexation was better. Lloyd George for his part believed that everyone had best get on with things, but it wasn’t long before the Big Three were in loggerheads, while everyone pretty much ignored poor old Vittorio Orlando. Another day meant another set of meetings, but while the 30th January 1919 was a day where mandates were clarified to their greatest extent yet, it was another classic case of kicking the can down the road. This left everyone free to take what they wanted from this new concept; a mandate, indeed could be anything you wanted it to be – it could be an empire in all but name… ************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 27, 2019, 11:54 p.m.

Versailles #28: Explaining Mandates (media.mp3)

In our 28th installment, we attempt to explain mandates - that surprisingly elusive concept which it was the task of those assembled in Paris to understand. Once they understood it and got to grips with how mandates would fit into the international system, it was hoped that then, this new mandates system would usher in a new era of freedom and prosperity for the formerly colonial peoples...but not all formerly colonial peoples...just those of the vanquished powers. In a prime example of 'one rule for me and one rule for everyone else', the victorious allies insisted that they had ruled their territories as benevolent actors more interested in the well-being and fortunes of their subjects than in imperial prestige, markets or resources. All assembled would trip over themselves on the 27 and 28 January in a bid to portray their rule as that which had benefited the colonies. Furthermore, on the basis of this idea that their record spoke for itself, the allies argued that mandates were not really necessary in many cases, because the world could trust them to directly rule the former colonies of Germany and the Ottoman Empire. Convinced or not, what these powers neglected to do with much effect or conviction was actually DEFINE what a mandate was, and what role or future it would have in the new international system. The grab for spoils, it seemed, dominated the imaginations of the allies and their dominions. Was this a new era, or was it simply more of the same? The jury might have been absent, but the ambition to rule certainly was not... ******************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 25, 2019, 10:48 p.m.

Delegation Game #2: Resolution, Revolution, Retribution (media.mp3)

Maybe following the REAL story of Versailles makes you feel glum. If so, why not follow a different tale - that of 37 delegates doing their part to have their own way and achieve their goals...by making a really big historical mess! As the League of Nations stood ready for presenting to the Plenary Conference in Paris, there was much going on in the Hotel Twamley... In the second episode the DG, we follow the fate of Lloyd George, as he attempted to confront the man responsible for imagining a proposal for devolved government in Ireland. What awaited the British Prime Minister when he met with Joseph Doherty face to face was a scene which was nothing like what Lloyd George had expected. He was out of his element, and he was at a loss, but perhaps there was silver lining? As the PM worked through this difficult experience, the Intermarium Free Trade Agreement was causing a great deal of controversy among those nations who felt overlooked or disadvantaged because of it. The Polish, Italian, Greek, Hungarian and Russian delegates had found success in this proposal, but the mission for defending it had the potential to unite all their enemies against them. The test was just about to begin... ********** The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 25, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #27: OTD 25th Jan 1919 - Wilson's Dream Realised (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 25TH JANUARY 1919 The first steps of the League of Nations were taken on this day a century ago, as the world learned exactly what Woodrow Wilson's idea meant for them and the future relations of so many states. What kind of principles would be adhered to, and which ones would be abandoned? How could Wilson traverse the objections, cynicism and scepticism of his friends and rivals? What did other people who were present at the time have to say about this second plenary conference? Considering the fact that the world had been welcomed to Paris, it was strange indeed that this was only the second time that all of its inhabitants had been welcomed together at once, but they were not here to debate or change Wilson's mind, only to listen and hopefully approve. This was the president's dream, and as far as was concerned only HE was qualified to make this dream a reality... *************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 24, 2019, 12:01 a.m.

Versailles #26: A League of Extraordinary Nations (media.mp3)

Before the League of Nations could be presented to the world, it was necessary to build up to that great and seismic event by examining...Russia? That didn't sound quite right, and yet the Council of Ten or Supreme Council worked through the 20-24 January as though the League of Extraordinary Nations which they were about to chair was weeks, rather than days away. In these circumstances, how could a coherent proposal for reimagining international relations be prepared on time? Mercifully, the committees were on the case, but this didn't mean that matters would proceed at all smoothly... ************ The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 21, 2019, midnight

Versailles #25: OTD 21st Jan 1919 - An Irish Eruption (media.mp3)

The Irish problem had not solved itself. Ever since the aftermath of the 1916 Rising, the neighbouring island had provided troubling signs of a future catastrophe, and with the proclamation of the Dáil or Irish assembly coinciding with an attack launched on Royal Irish Constabulary policemen, the catastrophe seemed to have arrived. The conflict which followed did not erupt evenly across the island. Instead it took the form of several ripples; a murder here, a robbery there, a high profile assassination somewhere in between. It was however, an unmistakable fact that Ireland was becoming more volatile. With the political mandate vested in Sinn Fein, violent Irish nationalism had reached a level of popularity and acceptance previously unknown, and this in turn meant that Britain faced an island mobilised more completely against her occupation and domination than ever before. Such facts were painfully awkward at a time when David Lloyd George was attempting to cast British rule as benevolent and civilising, as a force for good and as a facilitator of self-determination movements across the globe. Why, critics could ask, was London then ignoring its closest neighbours, in their quest to attain independent self-rule? These questions and so many more were etched into what became, by the summer of 1919, the Irish War of Independence, but the opening shots, in politics and on the battlefield, were fired on this day 100 years ago, when Ireland launched its bid for independence on a scale and with a passion never before seen or imagined possible... ***** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 18, 2019, 4:29 p.m.

Delegation Game #1: Welcome To Paris! (media.mp3)

Welcome delegates, to the first proper episode of the Delegation Game! Here we see everyone in the few hours before the plenary conference opened, and the Paris Peace Conference as we know it began. There was much to do, there was scheming aplenty and a great deal of opportunistic handshaking going on, as the delegations and the lonely delegates alike scoped out Hotel Twamley which would host them for the next six months. I am so incredibly excited and proud to present this to you guys - an idea which began around the time of the Armistice in November has ballooned in size and scope, to the point that I can now count 33 delegates, a number which is only set to increase as we go on. For those that have signed up and are playing the game, thanks so much for making this idea of mine a reality. For those that have yet to sign up, I hope this episode will indicate what's in store for you - absolutely every person that is mention here is played by a real person, and the negotiations continue in the Facebook group and the innumerable chat groups which await your presence! There is far too much going on here to list in detail, but if you want to learn more about what's going on, who is who and where their goals might lead, make sure and access the section of our website where we deal exclusively with the Delegation Game. For more information please don't hesitate to contact me through the usual channels! ****************** The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 18, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #24: OTD 18th Jan 1919 - The World Convenes At Paris (media.mp3)

OTD IN HISTORY - 18TH JANUARY 1919 - THE PEACE CONFERENCE OPENS! We finally made it, to the point of a new beginning for the world, in the war torn locations where so many foreign faces were travelling, and upon which so much hope had been places. There was a lot riding on the Paris Peace Conference, and those present on its very first plenary session, attended by all delegates then available in Paris, and a gigantic press corps, could not hide their excitement or positivity. It seemed as though anything was possible, with the world assembled here, to make a better peace for a better world. How could any power present deny the importance of peace? How could any power deny the importance of new institutions to safeguard the peace of the world like the League of Nations? Surely, only the wicked, the cynical, the deceitful, would dare ruin this goal of all civilised nations? Surely cooperation would be easily gained for the grandest of Woodrow Wilson's plans? Surely the world would not be let down by selfishness or fail to realise its potential? But the pragmatists knew better. They knew better because they had seen the true extent of the problems, some impossibly complex, others straightforward but no less intractable. Even those that had attended the previous week's meetings knew that arriving at consensus was not going to be as easy as they may have initially expected. But they were here, and they were eager to forge a lasting peace. The will and the intelligence was present, and the moment of truth had arrived, to put these qualities to their ultimate test... *************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 15, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #23: Settling Into Paris (media.mp3)

I am SO EXCITED to bring you all this episode. This is exactly what this project is all about - a comprehensive examination of primary sources, left to us by those that were in place and charged with TAKING charge a century ago. Here we cover the period of 13-17 January 1919, using the minutes of the Paris Peace Conference, provided by the US Foreign Relations papers series as our guide. I am super keen to hear what you all thought, but read on if you want to know more about this very chunky episode before you get started... By 15th January 1919, everyone of importance had arrived, but there was much work to be done before this world summit could open. In #23, we examine this body of work which preceded the official opening of the Paris Peace Conference. Join us as we drift between the major characters, assessing the major concerns of each, and the ways in which their aims created controversy and friction with their counterparts. It was not an easy task to make everyone feel on the same page, and the list of issues which each day threw up are too numerous to go into sufficient detail here. Suffice to say, in this episode, a whole range of problems come under our microscope, at the centre of them was Germany. Germany was the defeated power, yet she was not conquered. She was beaten, yet she could not be aggressively punished. She had been the enemy, yet the allies knew they would have to provide food for her people, otherwise a more sinister force would overthrow the fledgling German democracy before it had even left the cradle. This force was Bolshevism, moving like a torrent from the east, and the conflict reigned between those that feared pushing Germans too hard would occasion their succumbing to Bolshevism, and those that reasoned, whatever happened, the Germans had to be made to pay. The tension between these two viewpoints grew only larger as the difference in opinion became greater, and this all before the Conference had officially opened. But, then again, what was this Conference? Was it a preliminary, inter-allied gathering, designed to formulate the main terms of the peace treaty, which would then be left in the hands of minor diplomats to hammer out? Other questions abounded - what form of censorship should be used, did they need another committee? What would the official language of the Conference be? French, or English, or French and English? Why not Italian and Japanese then as well? How large should each of the smaller power's delegations be, and did the dominions have to have delegates since Britain could speak for them? Could Britain actually speak for them, or was the Empire, now the Commonwealth, past that point of deference to the mother country? The week preceding the official opening of the Conference, in short, threw up just as many questions, if not more, than answers. But one thing which was certain was that this Conference would remain in place in Paris, near the Palace of Versailles where the Supreme War Council had met in months past. Furthermore, a Supreme Council or Council of Ten would sit, composed of the premier and Foreign Minister of each of the five major powers (USA, UK, France, Italy and Japan) and this group would make executive decisions, guided by the appointed President of the Council, Georges Clemenceau. Administration and organisation were surely the intended goals of the week before the 18th January, but instead, this was for many the week when the scales began to fall from their eyes, and they began to come to terms with the sheer size of the challenge which loomed before them... ****************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access a...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 12, 2019, 1:30 a.m.

Versailles #22: OTD 12 Jan 1919 - Lloyd George Makes Three (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 12th January 1919 - David Lloyd George arrives in Paris for the preliminary peace talks. Before the Paris Peace Conference opened, it was important for all sides to meet and talk together. As all three men spoke English well, Wilson, Clemenceau and Lloyd George could be expected to do the bulk of the negotiating personally. However, the initial set up of the Conference did not allow this personal arrangement, so the three men took advantage of that precious week before the conference officially opened, during the preliminaries, to build relationships, wrest concessions and have a ramble around the French capital. The arrival of the British PM on 12 January kicked the preliminaries into high gear, and from the beginning, it became clear that everyone had travelled to Paris with a degree of optimism, but also with their own aims and ambitions. The Italians, as well, could not be ignored, and their support and assent for certain agreements was clearly going to be necessary if the wheels were to be greased and everything moved along. Give and take would have to be the motto of the day, if any progress was to be made... *********************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 11, 2019, 8:19 p.m.

The Delegation Game - How To Play (media.mp3)

With the launch of the Delegation Game only a week away (on 18th Jan 2019) I thought it'd be beneficial to set out some detail about this fantastic explosion of nerdiness, and what you need to do in order to take part. We look at some tools which the game will avail of, investigate what kind of impact your scheming can have on the proceedings, outline the structure of each episode going forward, and close the episode with some FAQ's, so that we're all on the same page. The Delegation Game is a seriously exciting effort by yours truly to engage more completely with the source material and era which the Versailles situation provides. I've already been blown away by the interest and enthusiasm shown, but if you'd like to know more, then this episode is for you! We launch in a week, so make sure you take your seat in Paris! Thankssss, and I'll see you all there soon! ********** The Delegation Game is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 10, 2019, 1:04 a.m.

Versailles #21: Spartacists in Berlin! (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 10th January 1919 - the Spartacist Uprising reaches its apex - before it is brutally crushed in Berlin. Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht were the most prolific casualties, but much more was going on beneath the surface than simply the execution of Germany's communist extremists. The establishment of organisations like the Freikorps, and the struggle for order and law in this defeated, depressed country, contain more than enough stories all by themselves.  In this episode, we will conclude our examination of this ill-fated uprising, assessing why it failed, what its aims were, whether it could have succeeded and how its impact was felt across the country and among the allies. Did it make the allies more or less eager to bring Germany to peace, before she succumbed to Bolshevism altogether? Let's find out, as we go back in time... **************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 8, 2019, 1:12 a.m.

Versailles #20: Germany and Revolution (media.mp3)

Germany was in dire straits by the time revolutionaries began taking over the streets in early 1919. Bolshevism was spreading westwards, but perhaps the most potent ingredient in this spread was the lack of available food, and the endless opportunities this gave rabble rousers to cause anarchy and chaos on an unimaginable scale. Hunger was a more powerful weapon than any political message, and the combination of this desperation for a solution and the despair at the lack of aid - not to mention the continuing blockade - would soon spell disaster. Initially Germans held it together, but they could only keep the lid on the boil for so long before it all erupted. Here, we examine the background to the infamous Spartacist Uprising which seemed to threaten the end of Germany as the world knew it! ************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 8, 2019, 1:12 a.m.

Versailles #20: Germany and Revolution (media.mp3)

Germany was in dire straits by the time revolutionaries began taking over the streets in early 1919. Bolshevism was spreading westwards, but perhaps the most potent ingredient in this spread was the lack of available food, and the endless opportunities this gave rabble rousers to cause anarchy and chaos on an unimaginable scale. Hunger was a more powerful weapon than any political message, and the combination of this desperation for a solution and the despair at the lack of aid - not to mention the continuing blockade - would soon spell disaster. Initially Germans held it together, but they could only keep the lid on the boil for so long before it all erupted. Here, we examine the background to the infamous Spartacist Uprising which seemed to threaten the end of Germany as the world knew it! ************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 3, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #19: Wilson Goes To Rome (media.mp3)

OVER_THIS_PERIOD_IN_HISTORY - the first week of January 1919 - Woodrow Wilson begins his tour of Italy! In Italy, as in France, the citizens of that exhausted country were excited indeed to received the American President, and for six days until his departure on 6th January, Wilson travelled across Italy meeting everyone from the Pope to the King to the Premier. His mission was one of networking and publicity, and it went well, even if the Italians, deep down, did not gel particularly well with Wilson's vision of a new world. The world Wilson imagined, that of cooperation, and end to imperialism and peace, was in contrast to an Italian leadership and people who expected to be rewarded for their entry into the war. In time, the tension would explode, and Italy would get nothing at Wilson's insistence, a bitterness which helped facilitate Mussolini's acsendency. Initially at least, however, the Italian people were Wilson's friends. ********************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Jan. 3, 2019, 2 a.m.

Versailles #19: Wilson Goes To Rome (media.mp3)

OVER_THIS_PERIOD_IN_HISTORY - the first week of January 1919 - Woodrow Wilson begins his tour of Italy! In Italy, as in France, the citizens of that exhausted country were excited indeed to received the American President, and for six days until his departure on 6th January, Wilson travelled across Italy meeting everyone from the Pope to the King to the Premier. His mission was one of networking and publicity, and it went well, even if the Italians, deep down, did not gel particularly well with Wilson's vision of a new world. The world Wilson imagined, that of cooperation, and end to imperialism and peace, was in contrast to an Italian leadership and people who expected to be rewarded for their entry into the war. In time, the tension would explode, and Italy would get nothing at Wilson's insistence, a bitterness which helped facilitate Mussolini's acsendency. Initially at least, however, the Italian people were Wilson's friends. ********************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 26, 2018, 2:01 a.m.

Versailles #18: OTD 26 Dec 1918 - Wilson Goes To London (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 26th December 1918 - Woodrow Wilson meets David Lloyd George in London! Hope you're all not TOO full of foodstuffs, because we have an important little bulletin to bring to you! The US President's visit to London in late 1918 was significant for a myriad of reasons - not least of which was the sight of an American President getting a horse and carriage ride through the city's streets! Who would ever have imagined that such displays were possible between former colony and former master? Now these powers were firm friends, and the relationship between President and PM would only improve as time went on, and the two men realised they had more and more in common, to the detriment of the French premier of course, who quickly became something of an outsider.  Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you history friends!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 26, 2018, 2:01 a.m.

Versailles #18: OTD 26 Dec 1918 - Wilson Goes To London (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 26th December 1918 - Woodrow Wilson meets David Lloyd George in London! Hope you're all not TOO full of foodstuffs, because we have an important little bulletin to bring to you! The US President's visit to London in late 1918 was significant for a myriad of reasons - not least of which was the sight of an American President getting a horse and carriage ride through the city's streets! Who would ever have imagined that such displays were possible between former colony and former master? Now these powers were firm friends, and the relationship between President and PM would only improve as time went on, and the two men realised they had more and more in common, to the detriment of the French premier of course, who quickly became something of an outsider.  Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you history friends!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 22, 2018, 7:20 p.m.

Alt-History: What If Gavrilo Princip Missed? #2 (media.mp3)

Here we conclude this incredible and early podcast Christmas present, which is 2/3 alternative history and 1/3 a breakdown of whether I believe this makes sense and why I went with what I did. How plausible was it all? You decide. This could be a very fun topic to have a number of debates on, but here we look at the opening phases of the war and what went right/wrong for each side. Irish troubles? Of course they are ever present! I hope you've enjoyed a different path instead of the dire one we got in 1914. Would the world be a better place had Princip missed? That's probably a story for another day, but for now we examine how the Entente came to collapse, and what this meant for the thoroughly victorious allies... Support and get in touch ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 22, 2018, 7:20 p.m.

Alt-History: What If Gavrilo Princip Missed? #2 (media.mp3)

Here we conclude this incredible and early podcast Christmas present, which is 2/3 alternative history and 1/3 a breakdown of whether I believe this makes sense and why I went with what I did. How plausible was it all? You decide. This could be a very fun topic to have a number of debates on, but here we look at the opening phases of the war and what went right/wrong for each side. Irish troubles? Of course they are ever present! I hope you've enjoyed a different path instead of the dire one we got in 1914. Would the world be a better place had Princip missed? That's probably a story for another day, but for now we examine how the Entente came to collapse, and what this meant for the thoroughly victorious allies... Support and get in touch ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 22, 2018, 7 p.m.

Alt-History: What If Gavrilo Princip Missed? #1 (media.mp3)

Welcome history friends, as we launch into a little sideshow I cooked up for you all. This is the first in a chunky 2-parter series on alternative history, where we build a different world in the style you're used to, having asked the question - what would have happened if Gavrilo Princip missed, rather than actually successfully assassinated the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand? Using all I've gathered in my years studying the First World War and the July Crisis in particular, I give you my answer, so I hope you enjoy it! Over the course of the episode we will look at several threads, such as the change in Serbian government and increasing tensions provoking reactionary policies across the Balkans, it remained to be seen whether the European alliance system would save the peace or help destroy it. Find out here, and remember to catch part 2! Support the show! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 22, 2018, 7 p.m.

Alt-History: What If Gavrilo Princip Missed? #1 (media.mp3)

Welcome history friends, as we launch into a little sideshow I cooked up for you all. This is the first in a chunky 2-parter series on alternative history, where we build a different world in the style you're used to, having asked the question - what would have happened if Gavrilo Princip missed, rather than actually successfully assassinated the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand? Using all I've gathered in my years studying the First World War and the July Crisis in particular, I give you my answer, so I hope you enjoy it! Over the course of the episode we will look at several threads, such as the change in Serbian government and increasing tensions provoking reactionary policies across the Balkans, it remained to be seen whether the European alliance system would save the peace or help destroy it. Find out here, and remember to catch part 2! Support the show! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 20, 2018, 2 a.m.

Versailles #17: The Big Three En Route (media.mp3)

You've been introduced to the Big Three of Wilson, Clemenceau and Lloyd George - you know their aims, their backstories and their fears. What happens though when these men gather together in the same room? Could they possibly cooperate? Could their varied viewpoints and aims be reconciled? Before the Paris Peace Conference opened, I feel it'd be useful to take each of the three men under our microscope again, and refresh ourselves on what they wanted, what they did NOT want, and that grey area where they could see themselves compromising. This episode will conveniently tie together all we've learned about the three men so far, and it is our last episode of the Versailles project before Christmas, so have a listen, refresh yourself, and I hope you have a safe and happy holiday season festivity Christmas food time! I think I covered all my bases! Thankssss :D  ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 20, 2018, 2 a.m.

Versailles #17: The Big Three En Route (media.mp3)

You've been introduced to the Big Three of Wilson, Clemenceau and Lloyd George - you know their aims, their backstories and their fears. What happens though when these men gather together in the same room? Could they possibly cooperate? Could their varied viewpoints and aims be reconciled? Before the Paris Peace Conference opened, I feel it'd be useful to take each of the three men under our microscope again, and refresh ourselves on what they wanted, what they did NOT want, and that grey area where they could see themselves compromising. This episode will conveniently tie together all we've learned about the three men so far, and it is our last episode of the Versailles project before Christmas, so have a listen, refresh yourself, and I hope you have a safe and happy holiday season festivity Christmas food time! I think I covered all my bases! Thankssss :D  ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 14, 2018, 5:38 a.m.

Versailles #16: OTD 14 Dec 1918 - Coupon Election (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 14th December 1918 - The Coupon Election secures Lloyd George's Coalition Government. It had long been expected that Lloyd George would call for an election at the end of the war, to beat off challenges to his position from both sides of the political spectrum, and to secure his mandate for the looming peace conference. Much was said about punishing Germany during the campaign trail, and making her pay what she owed to Britain and everyone else. The British electorate were thus heavy with expectation once their PM left for France in the new year - they anticipated Lloyd George would drive a hard bargain, and wrest concessions from the defeated foe which would vindicate their losses. As Lloyd George discovered, but probably knew already deep down, it wasn't so simple as taking things from Germany. Lloyd George, whatever his white lies, did managed to secure a mandate from the British electorate with this election. It was the most votes ever cast in any election in British history, and for the first time ever, women were also entitled to vote (so long as they were over 30 and were connected to someone with at least £5 of property that is...). The Coupon Election - so called for the curious way with which the incumbent government represented itself, with a coupon that indicated the loyalty of several varied candidates - was a success for the PM, but dark clouds were on the horizon. In Ireland, the old Irish Parliamentary Party had been wiped out by a new force called Sinn Fein, which refused to take its seats at Westminster. Within a month, a guerrilla war would erupt in Ireland, instigated by the decision of those Irish MPs to set up their own Parliament in Dublin. Still though, for the moment, Lloyd George could be happy. It was the result which Woodrow Wilson would have died for, because it granted a mandate for everything he did later, and demonstrated the faith and gratitude which the British people wished to express in their wartime leader. ***************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 14, 2018, 5:38 a.m.

Versailles #16: OTD 14 Dec 1918 - Coupon Election (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 14th December 1918 - The Coupon Election secures Lloyd George's Coalition Government. It had long been expected that Lloyd George would call for an election at the end of the war, to beat off challenges to his position from both sides of the political spectrum, and to secure his mandate for the looming peace conference. Much was said about punishing Germany during the campaign trail, and making her pay what she owed to Britain and everyone else. The British electorate were thus heavy with expectation once their PM left for France in the new year - they anticipated Lloyd George would drive a hard bargain, and wrest concessions from the defeated foe which would vindicate their losses. As Lloyd George discovered, but probably knew already deep down, it wasn't so simple as taking things from Germany. Lloyd George, whatever his white lies, did managed to secure a mandate from the British electorate with this election. It was the most votes ever cast in any election in British history, and for the first time ever, women were also entitled to vote (so long as they were over 30 and were connected to someone with at least £5 of property that is...). The Coupon Election - so called for the curious way with which the incumbent government represented itself, with a coupon that indicated the loyalty of several varied candidates - was a success for the PM, but dark clouds were on the horizon. In Ireland, the old Irish Parliamentary Party had been wiped out by a new force called Sinn Fein, which refused to take its seats at Westminster. Within a month, a guerrilla war would erupt in Ireland, instigated by the decision of those Irish MPs to set up their own Parliament in Dublin. Still though, for the moment, Lloyd George could be happy. It was the result which Woodrow Wilson would have died for, because it granted a mandate for everything he did later, and demonstrated the faith and gratitude which the British people wished to express in their wartime leader. ***************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 13, 2018, 3 a.m.

Versailles #15: OTD 13 Dec 1918 - Wilson's Welcome (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 13th December 1918 - US President Woodrow Wilson lands in France. Woodrow Wilson had a vital role to play in the Treaty of Versailles, and was certainly the most dynamic actor in the Paris Peace Conference. Apparently immune to the old trappings of statecraft, intrigue and power, Wilson represented something new and promising for those French citizens and Europeans who were sick of war and who longed for something better. Wilson's rapturous welcome convinced him that he had done the right thing by deciding to travel to Paris personally, even though many had disapproved back home. Flattered, excited, vindicated though he was, the reception did not last. Wilson would never be so popular in France again... *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 13, 2018, 3 a.m.

Versailles #15: OTD 13 Dec 1918 - Wilson's Welcome (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 13th December 1918 - US President Woodrow Wilson lands in France. Woodrow Wilson had a vital role to play in the Treaty of Versailles, and was certainly the most dynamic actor in the Paris Peace Conference. Apparently immune to the old trappings of statecraft, intrigue and power, Wilson represented something new and promising for those French citizens and Europeans who were sick of war and who longed for something better. Wilson's rapturous welcome convinced him that he had done the right thing by deciding to travel to Paris personally, even though many had disapproved back home. Flattered, excited, vindicated though he was, the reception did not last. Wilson would never be so popular in France again... *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 12, 2018, 5:56 p.m.

Versailles #14: David Lloyd George Profile Part 2/2 (media.mp3)

David Lloyd George's assent to the top of the greasy pole came at a difficult time for Britain and the allied war effort. The war did not appear near its end after all; instead the bloody stalemate had begun to tell, on all sides, and 1916 had been a year of crushing disappointments. Faced with a crisis in confidence, PM Asquith made way for the last Liberal Prime Minister of the age, Lloyd George, who ensured by early 1917 that he had the support of his colleagues in the wartime coalition to continue on with the war in the manner that he saw fit. Lloyd George's vision was tempered by realities and the hard lessons which still lay ahead, but he was at his best when delegating to his colleagues, when relinquishing something of his iron grip on power, and when accepting that sharing the load was the best way to win the war. New men were made and old men retreated from public life in disgust, but Lloyd George wasn't here to make friends. His single minded determination to win this damned war earned him admiration and appreciation, but it also represented the greatest test he had yet faced. That is, of course, until he had to craft the peace. Join us here as we unravel the traits which helped Lloyd George lead Britain to victory, no matter the cost... ******************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 12, 2018, 5:56 p.m.

Versailles #14: David Lloyd George Profile Part 2/2 (media.mp3)

David Lloyd George's assent to the top of the greasy pole came at a difficult time for Britain and the allied war effort. The war did not appear near its end after all; instead the bloody stalemate had begun to tell, on all sides, and 1916 had been a year of crushing disappointments. Faced with a crisis in confidence, PM Asquith made way for the last Liberal Prime Minister of the age, Lloyd George, who ensured by early 1917 that he had the support of his colleagues in the wartime coalition to continue on with the war in the manner that he saw fit. Lloyd George's vision was tempered by realities and the hard lessons which still lay ahead, but he was at his best when delegating to his colleagues, when relinquishing something of his iron grip on power, and when accepting that sharing the load was the best way to win the war. New men were made and old men retreated from public life in disgust, but Lloyd George wasn't here to make friends. His single minded determination to win this damned war earned him admiration and appreciation, but it also represented the greatest test he had yet faced. That is, of course, until he had to craft the peace. Join us here as we unravel the traits which helped Lloyd George lead Britain to victory, no matter the cost... ******************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 10, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #13: David Lloyd George Profile Part 1/2 (media.mp3)

David Lloyd George, the unlikely Prime Minister, and the only PM in history to have spoken Welsh fluently, comes under our microscope in the final of our profiler episode couplets. Lloyd George's childhood and upbringing, his experience of life in Wales, his love of country, of justice and of independence - these were all important building blocks of a character which would soon serve Britain at its most critical time. We open our account of Lloyd George with an anecdote from Harold Nicolson, a vital eyewitness to the events of the Paris Peace Conference, and a man who happened to be present when the PM jubilantly announced the end to the war. This represented the end of a long, exhausting journey for Lloyd George, but he wasn't finished yet! Join us as we unwrap Lloyd George the man, before he became Lloyd George the leader. ********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 10, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #13: David Lloyd George Profile Part 1/2 (media.mp3)

David Lloyd George, the unlikely Prime Minister, and the only PM in history to have spoken Welsh fluently, comes under our microscope in the final of our profiler episode couplets. Lloyd George's childhood and upbringing, his experience of life in Wales, his love of country, of justice and of independence - these were all important building blocks of a character which would soon serve Britain at its most critical time. We open our account of Lloyd George with an anecdote from Harold Nicolson, a vital eyewitness to the events of the Paris Peace Conference, and a man who happened to be present when the PM jubilantly announced the end to the war. This represented the end of a long, exhausting journey for Lloyd George, but he wasn't finished yet! Join us as we unwrap Lloyd George the man, before he became Lloyd George the leader. ********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 5, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #12: Woodrow Wilson Profile Part 2/2 (media.mp3)

Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points are an integral part of what made the end of the First World War so fascinating, but also so confusing. Did the President want to go easy on Germans for the sake of it, or did he have more ambitious goals in mind? Was he as determined to remake the post-war order as we are often told, or were these fourteen points simply a smokescreen for the imperialistic policies which the president wished to pursue? The answers to these questions are not clear cut, but join us for episode twelve where we discuss each of these points in turn, assess how they were received by the international community, examine the impact of each point, and then detail the president's feelings on the document which he had just communicated to the world. The Fourteen Points were supremely important, not least because they represented the first true statement of peace terms revealed by any of the allies. Coming as they did in January 1918, the end of the war was some way off, but it is impossible to understate their importance as the months ticked by. As the provided image shows, Germany made use of these points as the basis for a peace settlement which, they hoped, would grant them what they wanted. For a variety of reasons, they were to be sorely mistaken... ************ The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 5, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #12: Woodrow Wilson Profile Part 2/2 (media.mp3)

Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points are an integral part of what made the end of the First World War so fascinating, but also so confusing. Did the President want to go easy on Germans for the sake of it, or did he have more ambitious goals in mind? Was he as determined to remake the post-war order as we are often told, or were these fourteen points simply a smokescreen for the imperialistic policies which the president wished to pursue? The answers to these questions are not clear cut, but join us for episode twelve where we discuss each of these points in turn, assess how they were received by the international community, examine the impact of each point, and then detail the president's feelings on the document which he had just communicated to the world. The Fourteen Points were supremely important, not least because they represented the first true statement of peace terms revealed by any of the allies. Coming as they did in January 1918, the end of the war was some way off, but it is impossible to understate their importance as the months ticked by. As the provided image shows, Germany made use of these points as the basis for a peace settlement which, they hoped, would grant them what they wanted. For a variety of reasons, they were to be sorely mistaken... ************ The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 4, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #11: Woodrow Wilson Profile Part 1/2 (media.mp3)

Welcome to Woodrow Wilson's United States of America. As we build towards a key concept, the Fourteen Points, here we set some background and ask some pertinent questions, such as - why did the US intervene in the war, and why did Wilson wait so long before doing so? Woodrow Wilson is a character we must understand if we are to grasp the nuances of the Paris Peace Conference and the Treaty of Versailles which that created. Wilson was an integral part of what made the end Treaty so significant, but he can also be blamed for its uninspired record in America, and its ultimate failure. All the while, his message was one of firm but fair treatment for a defeated Germany, and this message was one which many at the top levels of Germany's government could not fail to heed. To understand where such high minded ideals came from, we must examine Woodrow Wilson before he arrived in Paris in late 1918. More than that, we must investigate whether Wilson's ideals were developed not to meet the crisis of the Great War, but as a repeat of what he had done before, in Mexico. Thus, we take a seemingly strange detour into the Mexican American border over 1913-1914, to get to the bottom of what the President was doing and why. Why did he care so much about what government was represented in Mexico? Why did he feel compelled to work against big businesses when they could have cut him a tidy profit? Wilson's actions led to turmoil along the border with Mexico, and even some Mexican raids into American soil, which Uncle Sam had to meet directly, as this cartoon suggests. My point is, in history, nothing is ever so straightforward as we might think. Wilson's famed ideals did not come from nowhere, and here we debate whether we can see their origins in the tumultuous relationship which America's southern neighbour had with the President. It's quite a journey, so I hope you'll join me to see where it takes us...  *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 4, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #11: Woodrow Wilson Profile Part 1/2 (media.mp3)

Welcome to Woodrow Wilson's United States of America. As we build towards a key concept, the Fourteen Points, here we set some background and ask some pertinent questions, such as - why did the US intervene in the war, and why did Wilson wait so long before doing so? Woodrow Wilson is a character we must understand if we are to grasp the nuances of the Paris Peace Conference and the Treaty of Versailles which that created. Wilson was an integral part of what made the end Treaty so significant, but he can also be blamed for its uninspired record in America, and its ultimate failure. All the while, his message was one of firm but fair treatment for a defeated Germany, and this message was one which many at the top levels of Germany's government could not fail to heed. To understand where such high minded ideals came from, we must examine Woodrow Wilson before he arrived in Paris in late 1918. More than that, we must investigate whether Wilson's ideals were developed not to meet the crisis of the Great War, but as a repeat of what he had done before, in Mexico. Thus, we take a seemingly strange detour into the Mexican American border over 1913-1914, to get to the bottom of what the President was doing and why. Why did he care so much about what government was represented in Mexico? Why did he feel compelled to work against big businesses when they could have cut him a tidy profit? Wilson's actions led to turmoil along the border with Mexico, and even some Mexican raids into American soil, which Uncle Sam had to meet directly, as this cartoon suggests. My point is, in history, nothing is ever so straightforward as we might think. Wilson's famed ideals did not come from nowhere, and here we debate whether we can see their origins in the tumultuous relationship which America's southern neighbour had with the President. It's quite a journey, so I hope you'll join me to see where it takes us...  *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 1, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #10: OTD 1 Dec 1918 - Birth of Yugoslavia (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 1st December 1918 - The Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes is proclaimed by Prince Regent Alexander of Serbia This kingdom, known to history as Yugoslavia, was to have a tumultuous birth, life cycle and death, but even its very name was contentious! Serbs wanted the state to indicate the greater Serb role in its administration and creation; non Serbs wanted to maintain the facade that all were equal under the new kingdom, and that it was more a union or federation than a unitary state. The facade was not maintained for long. This fragile kingdom, which drew together so many Balkan states and tidied up the region a great deal, was not built to last, but in this episode we examine the circumstances surrounding its proclamation, in the context of a world which was struggling to get to grips with everything that had come pouring out of Pandora's Box... ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Dec. 1, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #10: OTD 1 Dec 1918 - Birth of Yugoslavia (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - 1st December 1918 - The Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes is proclaimed by Prince Regent Alexander of Serbia This kingdom, known to history as Yugoslavia, was to have a tumultuous birth, life cycle and death, but even its very name was contentious! Serbs wanted the state to indicate the greater Serb role in its administration and creation; non Serbs wanted to maintain the facade that all were equal under the new kingdom, and that it was more a union or federation than a unitary state. The facade was not maintained for long. This fragile kingdom, which drew together so many Balkan states and tidied up the region a great deal, was not built to last, but in this episode we examine the circumstances surrounding its proclamation, in the context of a world which was struggling to get to grips with everything that had come pouring out of Pandora's Box... ************* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 30, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles #9: Eastern Europe Reborn (media.mp3)

If finding a solution to Western Europe was difficult, then untangling the morass which was Eastern Europe seemed like mission impossible. Thankfully for those flocking to Paris, Eastern Europeans had taken it upon themselves to do the legwork for them. Poles, Czechs, Yugoslavs and Romanians had all taken advantage of the power vacuums left by the vanished empires, and had staked their claims to land, people and resources while those in Paris gathered. Some leaders, like Edvard Benes (pictured) took matters into their own hands, while others were overtaken by the pace of events. In this episode we examine the fates and behaviours of these four powers, before they presented their individuals cases to the Paris Peace Conference in late January-early February 1919. All they would require, it was said, was the blessing of the statesmen at the French capital for their efforts...and maybe a tiny few adjustments here and there... *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 30, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles #9: Eastern Europe Reborn (media.mp3)

If finding a solution to Western Europe was difficult, then untangling the morass which was Eastern Europe seemed like mission impossible. Thankfully for those flocking to Paris, Eastern Europeans had taken it upon themselves to do the legwork for them. Poles, Czechs, Yugoslavs and Romanians had all taken advantage of the power vacuums left by the vanished empires, and had staked their claims to land, people and resources while those in Paris gathered. Some leaders, like Edvard Benes (pictured) took matters into their own hands, while others were overtaken by the pace of events. In this episode we examine the fates and behaviours of these four powers, before they presented their individuals cases to the Paris Peace Conference in late January-early February 1919. All they would require, it was said, was the blessing of the statesmen at the French capital for their efforts...and maybe a tiny few adjustments here and there... *********** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 28, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #8: OTD 28 Nov 1918 - Preparing Paris (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - sort of - everyone was going to Paris! Destination Paris: Mission, end the war! As thousands of people from all across the world flocked to Paris for the looming conference, Parisians and civil servants of all shades had the unenviable task of preparing the way for them. Hotels would have to acquired for the different delegations, some of these would have to be scrubbed from top to bottom.  Wine would have to be found, as would tons of foodstuffs. Along with the delegations, thousands of other people from printers, journalists and curious travellers to prostitutes, actors and entertainers crowded the city. The British warned that no space was left, but nobody took any notice. Paris was the capital of the world for eight long months, and the task of preparing Paris would have to be tackled before anyone could even think of any kind of itinerary... ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 28, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #8: OTD 28 Nov 1918 - Preparing Paris (media.mp3)

ON_THIS_DAY_IN_HISTORY - sort of - everyone was going to Paris! Destination Paris: Mission, end the war! As thousands of people from all across the world flocked to Paris for the looming conference, Parisians and civil servants of all shades had the unenviable task of preparing the way for them. Hotels would have to acquired for the different delegations, some of these would have to be scrubbed from top to bottom.  Wine would have to be found, as would tons of foodstuffs. Along with the delegations, thousands of other people from printers, journalists and curious travellers to prostitutes, actors and entertainers crowded the city. The British warned that no space was left, but nobody took any notice. Paris was the capital of the world for eight long months, and the task of preparing Paris would have to be tackled before anyone could even think of any kind of itinerary... ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 24, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #7: George Clemenceau Profile Part 2/2 (media.mp3)

"From the blind confusion of factional strife the Frenchman has emerged in this hour all of a piece throughout, stronger, more resolute, silent, smiling, his eyes bright with an invincible fire which affirms that the legend of France shall not fail…It is in that mysterious hour when something comes to birth in us which burns out the dross and clears the way for the casting of a metal which neither steel nor diamond can scratch. And when, some day, after superhuman efforts, all these souls, fatigued with heroism, meet again under the vast blue vault of a regenerated fatherland, it must be that of so many hearts which were sundered a soul of France will forge itself, and the discords which are a condition of life will dissolve, fast fused in a bond of solidarity so closely knit that nothing will have power to shatter it." These were the words which Georges Clemenceau used upon learning of the outbreak of the war. The war would cleanse France of its lethargy, provide it with an opportunity to redeem its past loss, and of course, provide an even more important opportunity to inflict a defeat upon Germany, and restore the rightful order of things. Nobody that marched to war in 1914 could have imagined the kind of losses which awaited their nation, and France was no exception. Her people quickly learned their lessons the hard way. In the month of August 1914 alone, 75,000 Frenchmen died. On the bloodiest day of the war for France, the 23rd August 1914, 27,000 men lay dead by the end of it. With losses like these, George Clemenceau quickly turned his attention to that critical question - why was the war so costly, and who was sabotaging France's successful realisation of its aims? It was above his imagination to think that actually, such casualties were the result not of sabotage or anyone's fault necessarily, and were instead the predicable consequences of a French high command which preferred old tactics like charging straight at the enemy - the cult of the offensive - while the soldiery were decked out in the finest clothing and fanciest accessories. France's old world was shattered after successive years in this meat grinder, but Clemenceau remained somewhat aloof from it all. A heavy critic of the government's method of fighting the war, Clemenceau found his paper banned and his friends no longer talking to him. Clemenceau became more shrill and less able to find some solution to the carnage, but in its hour of need, France relied on this formidable 76 year old once more. Against so many odds, this veteran statesman was at the helm of France again, and he had a strong message for those that would listen - not one more step back. Even if it took another August 1914 of casualties, Clemenceau was resolute in his determination not to give in to the German war effort. 1918 would test him to his limits, but at no point did the elder statesman ever imagine that making peace, would be just as difficult as winning the war ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 24, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #7: George Clemenceau Profile Part 2/2 (media.mp3)

"From the blind confusion of factional strife the Frenchman has emerged in this hour all of a piece throughout, stronger, more resolute, silent, smiling, his eyes bright with an invincible fire which affirms that the legend of France shall not fail…It is in that mysterious hour when something comes to birth in us which burns out the dross and clears the way for the casting of a metal which neither steel nor diamond can scratch. And when, some day, after superhuman efforts, all these souls, fatigued with heroism, meet again under the vast blue vault of a regenerated fatherland, it must be that of so many hearts which were sundered a soul of France will forge itself, and the discords which are a condition of life will dissolve, fast fused in a bond of solidarity so closely knit that nothing will have power to shatter it." These were the words which Georges Clemenceau used upon learning of the outbreak of the war. The war would cleanse France of its lethargy, provide it with an opportunity to redeem its past loss, and of course, provide an even more important opportunity to inflict a defeat upon Germany, and restore the rightful order of things. Nobody that marched to war in 1914 could have imagined the kind of losses which awaited their nation, and France was no exception. Her people quickly learned their lessons the hard way. In the month of August 1914 alone, 75,000 Frenchmen died. On the bloodiest day of the war for France, the 23rd August 1914, 27,000 men lay dead by the end of it. With losses like these, George Clemenceau quickly turned his attention to that critical question - why was the war so costly, and who was sabotaging France's successful realisation of its aims? It was above his imagination to think that actually, such casualties were the result not of sabotage or anyone's fault necessarily, and were instead the predicable consequences of a French high command which preferred old tactics like charging straight at the enemy - the cult of the offensive - while the soldiery were decked out in the finest clothing and fanciest accessories. France's old world was shattered after successive years in this meat grinder, but Clemenceau remained somewhat aloof from it all. A heavy critic of the government's method of fighting the war, Clemenceau found his paper banned and his friends no longer talking to him. Clemenceau became more shrill and less able to find some solution to the carnage, but in its hour of need, France relied on this formidable 76 year old once more. Against so many odds, this veteran statesman was at the helm of France again, and he had a strong message for those that would listen - not one more step back. Even if it took another August 1914 of casualties, Clemenceau was resolute in his determination not to give in to the German war effort. 1918 would test him to his limits, but at no point did the elder statesman ever imagine that making peace, would be just as difficult as winning the war ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 23, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #6: George Clemenceau Profile Part 1/2 (media.mp3)

France, that critically important cog in the machine of the Paris Peace Conference, had scores to settle and plenty to feel sorry about. The war had ripped through her people and country, bringing with it a plague of devastation unmatched in living memory. The flower of her youth lay dead, a demographic fact which she never truly recovered from. The final year of the war had been a trying and at times, gloomy one for France. Could Germany ever be defeated, was the question which seemed to surface at the beginning of every year, when some new general would propose a new offensive, only to be ground down again. All the while, the man on the ground would suffer.  By late 1917, the country was nearing despair. It needed tough, resolute and defiant leaders if the anticipated harshness of the year to come were to be endured. In response, France sent forth two men, Marshal Ferdinand Foch to head up the Supreme Allied Command on the Western Front, and Georges Clemenceau, a veteran statesman of the radical persuasion who held one goal above all - defeating Germany and inflicting a peace upon her which would save France from another trauma like the Great War. Here, we meet Clemenceau, as we place him in his proper context, and examine the haunting aftermath of so many years of war, and the impact it had on a wounded French Republic. As we move through the relevant powers, we build a picture of the different cast of the Treaty of Versailles which is vital for us to appreciate if we are to have any hope understanding what happened next. Make sure you join me! ******** Listen to The Land of Desire podcast for more details on French history and culture - check out that series on the Dreyfus Affair! The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 23, 2018, 1 a.m.

Versailles #6: George Clemenceau Profile Part 1/2 (media.mp3)

France, that critically important cog in the machine of the Paris Peace Conference, had scores to settle and plenty to feel sorry about. The war had ripped through her people and country, bringing with it a plague of devastation unmatched in living memory. The flower of her youth lay dead, a demographic fact which she never truly recovered from. The final year of the war had been a trying and at times, gloomy one for France. Could Germany ever be defeated, was the question which seemed to surface at the beginning of every year, when some new general would propose a new offensive, only to be ground down again. All the while, the man on the ground would suffer.  By late 1917, the country was nearing despair. It needed tough, resolute and defiant leaders if the anticipated harshness of the year to come were to be endured. In response, France sent forth two men, Marshal Ferdinand Foch to head up the Supreme Allied Command on the Western Front, and Georges Clemenceau, a veteran statesman of the radical persuasion who held one goal above all - defeating Germany and inflicting a peace upon her which would save France from another trauma like the Great War. Here, we meet Clemenceau, as we place him in his proper context, and examine the haunting aftermath of so many years of war, and the impact it had on a wounded French Republic. As we move through the relevant powers, we build a picture of the different cast of the Treaty of Versailles which is vital for us to appreciate if we are to have any hope understanding what happened next. Make sure you join me! ******** Listen to The Land of Desire podcast for more details on French history and culture - check out that series on the Dreyfus Affair! The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Become a delegate and play the Delegation Game for just $6 a month! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 19, 2018, 2 a.m.

Versailles #5: Armistice Wishlist (media.mp3)

Remember - check out the Delegation Game, and find out how you can participate in this exciting new way to make the very most out of this incredible centenary era...  The famed armistice was signed followed several weeks' worth of diplomatic process, and several hours' worth of meetings between statesmen that didn't like each other very much. By the time it was finished, the document which they were left with went far short of what many had wanted, and was too harsh in the minds of others. Still, at its face value, it was a document which would bring the war to an end. After so many weeks of preparation, it finally came down to this, and the Germans arrived to sign on the dotted line. Actually, they had arrived to negotiate, only to be told that signing was all they would be permitted to do. There would be no negotiation. After several days' dallying in these circumstances, the ten man German delegation accepted that it had no choice. At 5.20AM on 11th November 1918, the armistice document was signed. Within the document, 35 articles stipulated what would happen next.  We have, of course, touched on this event before, but in this episode we delve into this seismic event in history with the detail that you've come to love and expect from WDF, so tune in here! The Germans held out hope that many of these more difficult terms would be modified at a peace conference which was due to follow. For all intents and purposes though, even though the peacemaking was not over, the Great War finally was.  ****** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 19, 2018, 2 a.m.

Versailles #5: Armistice Wishlist (media.mp3)

Remember - check out the Delegation Game, and find out how you can participate in this exciting new way to make the very most out of this incredible centenary era...  The famed armistice was signed followed several weeks' worth of diplomatic process, and several hours' worth of meetings between statesmen that didn't like each other very much. By the time it was finished, the document which they were left with went far short of what many had wanted, and was too harsh in the minds of others. Still, at its face value, it was a document which would bring the war to an end. After so many weeks of preparation, it finally came down to this, and the Germans arrived to sign on the dotted line. Actually, they had arrived to negotiate, only to be told that signing was all they would be permitted to do. There would be no negotiation. After several days' dallying in these circumstances, the ten man German delegation accepted that it had no choice. At 5.20AM on 11th November 1918, the armistice document was signed. Within the document, 35 articles stipulated what would happen next.  We have, of course, touched on this event before, but in this episode we delve into this seismic event in history with the detail that you've come to love and expect from WDF, so tune in here! The Germans held out hope that many of these more difficult terms would be modified at a peace conference which was due to follow. For all intents and purposes though, even though the peacemaking was not over, the Great War finally was.  ****** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 18, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles #4: Vision of Division (media.mp3)

Remember - check out the Delegation Game, and find out how you can participate in this exciting new way to make the very most out of this incredible centenary era... Sometimes, it isn't always the best idea to take vain people at their word. In the case of Edward House, the situation which he claimed to have created in Paris, in the run up to the signing of the armistice, and the situation he ACTUALLY created, proved to be two very different things. After several days meeting intimately with European leaders, House may have believed that he understood and could read these men, but in reality, they were the ones reading and manipulating him! In episode 4, 'Vision of Division', we examine this disconnect between what House believed he had achieved, and what had actually taken place during the preliminary peace negotiations. This episode is essential for establishing the foundations of what would take place later on at Versailles. House, indeed, had wrested from the allies a concession to make the Fourteen Points the basis for all peace settlements. However, this was qualified with several reservations, and House gave so much in return, particularly to the harsh armistice document, which was being drawn up at the same time, that his gains appear inconsequential in contrast to what he had been forced to sacrifice.  The story, as ever, is one of intrigue, personal diplomacy, lobbying, disappointment, lies and frustration, and represents a prelude to the Paris Peace Conference which was to come. By the end, the allies had their armistice in hand, and the Germans were expected to agree to make peace within a few days, but at what cost?  ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 18, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles #4: Vision of Division (media.mp3)

Remember - check out the Delegation Game, and find out how you can participate in this exciting new way to make the very most out of this incredible centenary era... Sometimes, it isn't always the best idea to take vain people at their word. In the case of Edward House, the situation which he claimed to have created in Paris, in the run up to the signing of the armistice, and the situation he ACTUALLY created, proved to be two very different things. After several days meeting intimately with European leaders, House may have believed that he understood and could read these men, but in reality, they were the ones reading and manipulating him! In episode 4, 'Vision of Division', we examine this disconnect between what House believed he had achieved, and what had actually taken place during the preliminary peace negotiations. This episode is essential for establishing the foundations of what would take place later on at Versailles. House, indeed, had wrested from the allies a concession to make the Fourteen Points the basis for all peace settlements. However, this was qualified with several reservations, and House gave so much in return, particularly to the harsh armistice document, which was being drawn up at the same time, that his gains appear inconsequential in contrast to what he had been forced to sacrifice.  The story, as ever, is one of intrigue, personal diplomacy, lobbying, disappointment, lies and frustration, and represents a prelude to the Paris Peace Conference which was to come. By the end, the allies had their armistice in hand, and the Germans were expected to agree to make peace within a few days, but at what cost?  ********* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 17, 2018, 1:27 a.m.

Versailles #3: The House That House Built (media.mp3)

Now THIS is exciting - click here to learn more about the aforementioned Delegation Game which I talked about for a great deal in this episode, and remember to connect with me if you have any questions! To everyone else, I hope you weren't too bothered by my rambling about it for ten minutes - I'm just super excited, and I think it could really be something special! Onto this episode at hand though, and we come to Edward House, Woodrow Wilson's best friend; a man whom the president could truly talk to like no other man. Wilson and House had been friends for years, and this friendship had grown and blossomed ever since Wilson became President. Considering their relationship, it seems bizarre to me that Wilson would send his friend to a place like Paris in late October 1918, and task him with arranging the preliminary negotiations for an armistice. Not only that, House was also tasked with paving the way forward for a peace conference that upheld the Fourteen Points as its basis. This was quite the mission, even for a formidable man like House, yet according to one source in particular (namely, House's diary), he was more than up to the task. From 26 October to 3 November, House represented his President to the British and French premiers, as the terms of an armistice, and an agreement about the foundations for a peace settlement were hammered out. House proclaimed a diplomatic triumph, but on closer inspection, the American diplomatic position was not as strong as the President may have liked to believe. Listening to this episode, 'The House That House Built' is a must for those interested in the American diplomatic approach, and in characters like Edward House, who were to dominate the peace negotiations for the next six months. House is the first of many vibrant characters which the era threw up, and while he was far from perfect, his actions would create an indelible mark upon the proceedings which were to follow, for better and for worse...  Interested in reading Edward House's diary online for free? Click here, and thanksss again to Yale for making it all possible!  ******* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 17, 2018, 1:27 a.m.

Versailles #3: The House That House Built (media.mp3)

Now THIS is exciting - click here to learn more about the aforementioned Delegation Game which I talked about for a great deal in this episode, and remember to connect with me if you have any questions! To everyone else, I hope you weren't too bothered by my rambling about it for ten minutes - I'm just super excited, and I think it could really be something special! Onto this episode at hand though, and we come to Edward House, Woodrow Wilson's best friend; a man whom the president could truly talk to like no other man. Wilson and House had been friends for years, and this friendship had grown and blossomed ever since Wilson became President. Considering their relationship, it seems bizarre to me that Wilson would send his friend to a place like Paris in late October 1918, and task him with arranging the preliminary negotiations for an armistice. Not only that, House was also tasked with paving the way forward for a peace conference that upheld the Fourteen Points as its basis. This was quite the mission, even for a formidable man like House, yet according to one source in particular (namely, House's diary), he was more than up to the task. From 26 October to 3 November, House represented his President to the British and French premiers, as the terms of an armistice, and an agreement about the foundations for a peace settlement were hammered out. House proclaimed a diplomatic triumph, but on closer inspection, the American diplomatic position was not as strong as the President may have liked to believe. Listening to this episode, 'The House That House Built' is a must for those interested in the American diplomatic approach, and in characters like Edward House, who were to dominate the peace negotiations for the next six months. House is the first of many vibrant characters which the era threw up, and while he was far from perfect, his actions would create an indelible mark upon the proceedings which were to follow, for better and for worse...  Interested in reading Edward House's diary online for free? Click here, and thanksss again to Yale for making it all possible!  ******* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 16, 2018, 12:18 a.m.

Versailles #2: Germany Falling, Germany Falling (media.mp3)

It is impossible to tell the story of the Treaty of Versailles without Germany, and in episode 2 of the VAP, 'Germany Falling, Germany Falling', we examine the state of Germany in military, economic and societal terms by mid-1918. A campaign which had started out so strong and filled everyone with false hope ended in failure. The gamble to move all men from east to the western front had failed, and the chasm in capability was growing by the hour. Stark pronouncements on the true state of affairs may have caught many Germans by surprise, but for those that had endured horrific deprivations, been starved, wounded, abandoned or simply vanished into the despair of total war, the reality cannot have been too much of a surprise. In this episode we place in context the gradual collapse of Germany in 1918, even while some in the country attempted, for their own reasons, to mount some form of final stand. Grim though the prospects of Germany seemed, there were some in the upper echelons of the military and civilian government who believed, for one reason or another, that Germany still had some potent cards to play. Episode 7, 'Ignoring Defeat' examines these last ditch efforts to save face and achieve peace with honour for Germany.  What could Germans realistically do to avoid the worst peace terms? What did America's associates think of these back channel negotiations? How, indeed, did the Germans interpret all that went down in autumn 1918 as anything other than a catastrophe to be exited from at once? The truth is that, although she was defeated, the German army was not destroyed, and for as long as they could, certain figures within the country were willing to use the threat of resistance to the end as a last resort, even while at home, emaciated bodies lined the streets, mutinies piled up and soldiers deserted in droves. The collapse was imminent, seen most infamously in the Spartacist Revolution, but while she teetered on the edge, Germany made one last attempt to have things her way... ******* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 16, 2018, 12:18 a.m.

Versailles #2: Germany Falling, Germany Falling (media.mp3)

It is impossible to tell the story of the Treaty of Versailles without Germany, and in episode 2 of the VAP, 'Germany Falling, Germany Falling', we examine the state of Germany in military, economic and societal terms by mid-1918. A campaign which had started out so strong and filled everyone with false hope ended in failure. The gamble to move all men from east to the western front had failed, and the chasm in capability was growing by the hour. Stark pronouncements on the true state of affairs may have caught many Germans by surprise, but for those that had endured horrific deprivations, been starved, wounded, abandoned or simply vanished into the despair of total war, the reality cannot have been too much of a surprise. In this episode we place in context the gradual collapse of Germany in 1918, even while some in the country attempted, for their own reasons, to mount some form of final stand. Grim though the prospects of Germany seemed, there were some in the upper echelons of the military and civilian government who believed, for one reason or another, that Germany still had some potent cards to play. Episode 7, 'Ignoring Defeat' examines these last ditch efforts to save face and achieve peace with honour for Germany.  What could Germans realistically do to avoid the worst peace terms? What did America's associates think of these back channel negotiations? How, indeed, did the Germans interpret all that went down in autumn 1918 as anything other than a catastrophe to be exited from at once? The truth is that, although she was defeated, the German army was not destroyed, and for as long as they could, certain figures within the country were willing to use the threat of resistance to the end as a last resort, even while at home, emaciated bodies lined the streets, mutinies piled up and soldiers deserted in droves. The collapse was imminent, seen most infamously in the Spartacist Revolution, but while she teetered on the edge, Germany made one last attempt to have things her way... ******* The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! ->Visit the homeland for this new project! ->Support the podcast financially and access ad free episodes with transcripts from just $2 a month!  ->Follow WDF on Twitter!  ->Join the Facebook group! ->Subscribe on iTunes!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 13, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles Introduction Part 3/3 (media.mp3)

Another introduction episode - this one giving us a brief(ish) rundown on the origins of the Great War, for the benefit of those that have not listened to the July Crisis Anniversary Project of old. The world went to war in 1914, and the circumstances which surround that event are often held against Germany in the subsequent peace negotiations. Germany, it is said, started the whole wretched thing, so she should be punished once her gamble failed, and she clearly lost. In my view though, it isn't that simple. Historians tend to take one side or the other when it comes to examining the July Crisis and Treaty of Versailles. By that I mean, either Germany started the war and deserved the Treaty, or she didn't start it or deserve it. I won't be this clear cut, because the situation and the debate aren't this clear cut. In my mind, Germany alone did not start the war - even though technically she did declare war on Russia first and begin the countdown - but she did deserve some kind of punishment for LOSING it.  Germany, as my thesis for this project will argue, was punished for losing the Great War, not for starting it.  Any statesman worth their salt in 1918-19 knew full well that there was more to the story than the straightforward tale of the belligerent Hun. Germany had to be punished and kept low so that she could not threaten the peace again, and because of her military loss, this meant that she was liable to be punished - just as Berlin had punished her enemies in Russia and Romania, and developed grand plans for punishing Britain and France before her war plans collapsed. The issue with Versailles wasn't so much the injustice of it, as we will learn, but the problem of making Germany accept its terms, when Germans came to believe that they hadn't been truly beaten, hadn't truly started the war, and had been unfairly blamed. Yet, an important point to remember is that war guilt - another issue we will deal with in time - did not have to exist in Germany in order for the judgement of Germany's contemporaries to follow. It did not matter, in other words, who started the war, as much as it mattered who lost it, and what was to be done next. This episode will help us refocus our gaze on that critical issue, and also ensure that we're all on the same page when it comes to my thesis and ideas about the origins of the First World War. As always, I'd ask you guys keep an open mind - we'll be sticking together for the next eight months, so you better get used to my outside the box way of thinking! ***************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! Visit the homeland for this new project:  http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/ Support the podcast financially:  https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Follow WDF on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 13, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles Introduction Part 3/3 (media.mp3)

Another introduction episode - this one giving us a brief(ish) rundown on the origins of the Great War, for the benefit of those that have not listened to the July Crisis Anniversary Project of old. The world went to war in 1914, and the circumstances which surround that event are often held against Germany in the subsequent peace negotiations. Germany, it is said, started the whole wretched thing, so she should be punished once her gamble failed, and she clearly lost. In my view though, it isn't that simple. Historians tend to take one side or the other when it comes to examining the July Crisis and Treaty of Versailles. By that I mean, either Germany started the war and deserved the Treaty, or she didn't start it or deserve it. I won't be this clear cut, because the situation and the debate aren't this clear cut. In my mind, Germany alone did not start the war - even though technically she did declare war on Russia first and begin the countdown - but she did deserve some kind of punishment for LOSING it.  Germany, as my thesis for this project will argue, was punished for losing the Great War, not for starting it.  Any statesman worth their salt in 1918-19 knew full well that there was more to the story than the straightforward tale of the belligerent Hun. Germany had to be punished and kept low so that she could not threaten the peace again, and because of her military loss, this meant that she was liable to be punished - just as Berlin had punished her enemies in Russia and Romania, and developed grand plans for punishing Britain and France before her war plans collapsed. The issue with Versailles wasn't so much the injustice of it, as we will learn, but the problem of making Germany accept its terms, when Germans came to believe that they hadn't been truly beaten, hadn't truly started the war, and had been unfairly blamed. Yet, an important point to remember is that war guilt - another issue we will deal with in time - did not have to exist in Germany in order for the judgement of Germany's contemporaries to follow. It did not matter, in other words, who started the war, as much as it mattered who lost it, and what was to be done next. This episode will help us refocus our gaze on that critical issue, and also ensure that we're all on the same page when it comes to my thesis and ideas about the origins of the First World War. As always, I'd ask you guys keep an open mind - we'll be sticking together for the next eight months, so you better get used to my outside the box way of thinking! ***************** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! Visit the homeland for this new project:  http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/ Support the podcast financially:  https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Follow WDF on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 12, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles Introduction Part 2/3 (media.mp3)

We must set the structure and sources of this project in front of you before we jump right into it, and we should also clarify our aims before we go any further too. We have got a LOT of ground to get into over the next eight months, but I hope that you are ready to join me for this fascinating and illuminating journey, as we examine this era of our past like you've never seen it before. Of course it is worth setting forth our aims: 1) create the most comprehensive, but also the most accessible, account of the Treaty of Versailles in audio form. 2) investigate whether the Treaty really was so bad, or whether some redeeming features exist within it. 3) ascertain how responsible, if at all, the Treaty was for all the vile catastrophes that followed it in the 20th century. ***** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! Visit the homeland for this new project:  http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/ Support the podcast financially:  https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Follow WDF on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 12, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Versailles Introduction Part 2/3 (media.mp3)

We must set the structure and sources of this project in front of you before we jump right into it, and we should also clarify our aims before we go any further too. We have got a LOT of ground to get into over the next eight months, but I hope that you are ready to join me for this fascinating and illuminating journey, as we examine this era of our past like you've never seen it before. Of course it is worth setting forth our aims: 1) create the most comprehensive, but also the most accessible, account of the Treaty of Versailles in audio form. 2) investigate whether the Treaty really was so bad, or whether some redeeming features exist within it. 3) ascertain how responsible, if at all, the Treaty was for all the vile catastrophes that followed it in the 20th century. ***** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! Visit the homeland for this new project:  http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/ Support the podcast financially:  https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Follow WDF on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 12, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Versailles Introduction Part 1/3 (media.mp3)

To make it through the tons of research material available on the Treaty of Versailles, it is essential we take a certain angle as our guide. Find out what kind of angle I am interested in, and how I plan to divide the different sections of this project up, so that you and I can get through it with our sanity maintained! It's going to be a wild ride to 28th June, but before we reach those sumptuous halls (below), we first have to paint a picture, or series of pictures, that help us set the scene. As ever, context is our King, and it's time we got right down to it...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 12, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Versailles Introduction Part 1/3 (media.mp3)

To make it through the tons of research material available on the Treaty of Versailles, it is essential we take a certain angle as our guide. Find out what kind of angle I am interested in, and how I plan to divide the different sections of this project up, so that you and I can get through it with our sanity maintained! It's going to be a wild ride to 28th June, but before we reach those sumptuous halls (below), we first have to paint a picture, or series of pictures, that help us set the scene. As ever, context is our King, and it's time we got right down to it...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 11, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Versailles #1: OTD 11 Nov 2018 - To The Last Man (media.mp3)

It's time. It's time at long last to unleash this project, to reveal the hidden complexities, the terrible truths, the dire dangers, the fascinating characters and the inspiring anecdotes of the period in history so often maligned and misunderstood, but so critically important to our world. It's time to go to 11th November 1918, where the guns fell silent at long last, and the birds could finally be heard to sing. ****** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! Visit the homeland for this new project:  http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/ Support the podcast financially:  https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Follow WDF on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 11, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Versailles #1: OTD 11 Nov 2018 - To The Last Man (media.mp3)

It's time. It's time at long last to unleash this project, to reveal the hidden complexities, the terrible truths, the dire dangers, the fascinating characters and the inspiring anecdotes of the period in history so often maligned and misunderstood, but so critically important to our world. It's time to go to 11th November 1918, where the guns fell silent at long last, and the birds could finally be heard to sing. ****** The Versailles Anniversary Project is possible because of your support and interest - make sure to spread the word, engage with the debate, and look at the different ways you can help this project succeed! Visit the homeland for this new project:  http://www.wdfpodcast.com/vap/ Support the podcast financially:  https://www.patreon.com/WhenDiplomacyFails Follow WDF on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/wdfpodcast

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 8, 2018, 11:21 a.m.

WDF: State of the Podcast Address 8th November 2018 (media.mp3)

WDF is about to be positively lit up by the most ambitious project we've ever taken on, but before we jump into that, I felt it only right that I bring you guys up to speed with my new job, how I got on in the Sound Education Podcast Conference in Harvard, some notes about the podcasting schedule, a bit on Dan Carlin, some more info about my future and even more ramblings - sounds like a state of the podcast address to me!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Nov. 8, 2018, 11:21 a.m.

WDF: State of the Podcast Address 8th November 2018 (media.mp3)

WDF is about to be positively lit up by the most ambitious project we've ever taken on, but before we jump into that, I felt it only right that I bring you guys up to speed with my new job, how I got on in the Sound Education Podcast Conference in Harvard, some notes about the podcasting schedule, a bit on Dan Carlin, some more info about my future and even more ramblings - sounds like a state of the podcast address to me!

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 30, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Korean War: Conclusion (media.mp3)

It's time to say goodbye to this incredible era, and to end this whopper journey we've been on for the past 11+ months. I really can't believe we're here, but we are, and I figured there was never a better time to end this series, than on my birthday, so happy birthday to me! Our conclusion examines a suitably poignant moment in recent history - the location of a reunion of Korean families, trapped and separated for more than six decades by a war which they never wanted, but which they have been paying for for their entire lives. It is here, I believe, that we should end our story - with a reminder that the greatest losers in the conflict of no winners, was the Korean people themselves. Thankssss as always for joining me history friends, and make sure you prepare yourselves for the Versailles Anniversary Project, coming on 11 November 2018...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 30, 2018, 1:01 a.m.

Korean War: Conclusion (media.mp3)

It's time to say goodbye to this incredible era, and to end this whopper journey we've been on for the past 11+ months. I really can't believe we're here, but we are, and I figured there was never a better time to end this series, than on my birthday, so happy birthday to me! Our conclusion examines a suitably poignant moment in recent history - the location of a reunion of Korean families, trapped and separated for more than six decades by a war which they never wanted, but which they have been paying for for their entire lives. It is here, I believe, that we should end our story - with a reminder that the greatest losers in the conflict of no winners, was the Korean people themselves. Thankssss as always for joining me history friends, and make sure you prepare yourselves for the Versailles Anniversary Project, coming on 11 November 2018...

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 29, 2018, 12:01 p.m.

Korean War #48: Something of an Ending (media.mp3)

It's time to say good bye! Episode 48: Something Of An Ending gathers together everything we’ve learned over the last 47 episodes and returns to those key questions, theories and goals which opened our series all those months ago. It is a typically intensive episode, since we have a good deal of stuff to talk about, several things to reiterate and not a small amount of final goodbyes to wave at our key figures. By now you have seen our narrative underline and hopefully vindicate my conclusions, which I presented to you guys all the way back in the introduction episodes. It’s been quite a journey, to put it mildly, and I have sincerely enjoyed taking it with you, as we learned, laughed and were shocked together.  I hope you’ll continue to seek out new information on the Korean War, and that you now have seen for yourself that this conflict is so much more than just a few sentences in a textbook. Instead, it was the vital ingredient in the Cold War, the terrible tragedy which cost millions of lives, and the start point for countless diplomatic and military initiatives, with varying degrees of success. The Korean War was many things to many people, but now it’s time for us to say goodbye, and to prepare for our next series – the Versailles Anniversary Project. Of course, this wouldn’t be WDF if we didn’t have an Epilogue and Conclusion to round our narrative off, so make sure you place the cherry on top of our experience here, by tracking those episodes down in the next few days. Other than that my lovely history friends and patrons – it is time to say thanksss, and I’ll be seeing you all soon! ********** Music used: “Streets of New York” by Billy Murray released in 1907. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Billy_Murray/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03032015/The_Streets_of_New_York_-_Billy_Murray  SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 29, 2018, 12:01 p.m.

Korean War #48: Something of an Ending (media.mp3)

It's time to say good bye! Episode 48: Something Of An Ending gathers together everything we’ve learned over the last 47 episodes and returns to those key questions, theories and goals which opened our series all those months ago. It is a typically intensive episode, since we have a good deal of stuff to talk about, several things to reiterate and not a small amount of final goodbyes to wave at our key figures. By now you have seen our narrative underline and hopefully vindicate my conclusions, which I presented to you guys all the way back in the introduction episodes. It’s been quite a journey, to put it mildly, and I have sincerely enjoyed taking it with you, as we learned, laughed and were shocked together.  I hope you’ll continue to seek out new information on the Korean War, and that you now have seen for yourself that this conflict is so much more than just a few sentences in a textbook. Instead, it was the vital ingredient in the Cold War, the terrible tragedy which cost millions of lives, and the start point for countless diplomatic and military initiatives, with varying degrees of success. The Korean War was many things to many people, but now it’s time for us to say goodbye, and to prepare for our next series – the Versailles Anniversary Project. Of course, this wouldn’t be WDF if we didn’t have an Epilogue and Conclusion to round our narrative off, so make sure you place the cherry on top of our experience here, by tracking those episodes down in the next few days. Other than that my lovely history friends and patrons – it is time to say thanksss, and I’ll be seeing you all soon! ********** Music used: “Streets of New York” by Billy Murray released in 1907. Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Billy_Murray/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_03032015/The_Streets_of_New_York_-_Billy_Murray  SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 29, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Korean War #47: Ike Will Bring Them Home! (media.mp3)

Episode 47: Ike Will Bring Them Home! This is our penultimate episode, and as such plays a critical role in bringing several threads of our narrative together. How fluent in the use of atomic diplomacy was Eisenhower’s administration? Armed with the knowledge we have from the last episode, we can state that Eisenhower was far from the first President to bring atomic weapons into the diplomatic discourse. Indeed, it makes sense that the first and last president of the US to make use of the atomic bomb should make the most active use of it in diplomacy. In addition, contrary to the conventional view, Eisenhower’s administration failed in the last phase of the Korean War to actually formulate a coherent policy regarding nuclear weapons and diplomatic pressure. For a number of reasons, the former General was content to drag his feet. Dispensing with the myths of atomic diplomacy enables us to look more closely at the very real role which the Indians played in putting forward the policy ideas in the UN General Assembly, most notably in the case of the touchy prisoners issue. The genuine importance of Indian diplomacy in that institution has been greatly understated for some time, and in this episode we’ll give them their proper due. The Chinese will of course also need to be considered, since if atomic diplomacy did not force them to make peace, what can we say actually did? The answer has as much to do with the policy of bluff as it does with the death of Josef Stalin, and it’s another fascinating journey I can’t wait to take you on! Of course, the major appeal of this episode is in the loose ends are tied up – it is in this instalment of our series that the Korean War is finally brought to its anticlimactic end on 27th July 1953. SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 29, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Korean War #47: Ike Will Bring Them Home! (media.mp3)

Episode 47: Ike Will Bring Them Home! This is our penultimate episode, and as such plays a critical role in bringing several threads of our narrative together. How fluent in the use of atomic diplomacy was Eisenhower’s administration? Armed with the knowledge we have from the last episode, we can state that Eisenhower was far from the first President to bring atomic weapons into the diplomatic discourse. Indeed, it makes sense that the first and last president of the US to make use of the atomic bomb should make the most active use of it in diplomacy. In addition, contrary to the conventional view, Eisenhower’s administration failed in the last phase of the Korean War to actually formulate a coherent policy regarding nuclear weapons and diplomatic pressure. For a number of reasons, the former General was content to drag his feet. Dispensing with the myths of atomic diplomacy enables us to look more closely at the very real role which the Indians played in putting forward the policy ideas in the UN General Assembly, most notably in the case of the touchy prisoners issue. The genuine importance of Indian diplomacy in that institution has been greatly understated for some time, and in this episode we’ll give them their proper due. The Chinese will of course also need to be considered, since if atomic diplomacy did not force them to make peace, what can we say actually did? The answer has as much to do with the policy of bluff as it does with the death of Josef Stalin, and it’s another fascinating journey I can’t wait to take you on! Of course, the major appeal of this episode is in the loose ends are tied up – it is in this instalment of our series that the Korean War is finally brought to its anticlimactic end on 27th July 1953. SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 26, 2018, 2:14 p.m.

Korean War #46: Atomic Diplomacy (media.mp3)

Episode 46: Atomic Diplomacy looks at the fascinating tactic supposedly made use of by the Eisenhower administration in the first half of 1953. This policy of threatening nuclear war if the communists did not see sense worked, so the conventional account suggests, and it worked because NSC68 had so empowered American defensive capabilities. However, as we’ll see in this episode, Eisenhower’s tactic was neither completely successful nor was it unprecedented. In fact, to set the background by what we mean when we talk about atomic diplomacy, in this episode we’ll examine not Eisenhower’s, but Truman’s consistent approach to that weapon in diplomatic negotiations, while we also assess the general perspective of the political and military staffs of the early 1950s. The result is a surprising but also critically important set of take aways – not only was Truman unsuccessful in his efforts to bluster with the atomic bomb, he also learned from these failures, and refrained from threatening the communists from spring 1951. This gap enabled the Eisenhower administration, or more accurately John Foster Dulles, to claim that the new brand of atomic diplomacy was a great success, and played a leading role in ending the war. The truth, as we’ll learn, was far from so straightforward. ********* Music used: “Take Me Out To The Ball-game”, by the Hayden Quartet released in 1908. This classic should be familiar to everyone, even those like myself who don’t know what’s going on if they watch a baseball game! Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Hadyn_Quartet/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04212015/Take_Me_Out_to_the_Ballgame_-_Hadyn_Quartet  SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 26, 2018, 2:14 p.m.

Korean War #46: Atomic Diplomacy (media.mp3)

Episode 46: Atomic Diplomacy looks at the fascinating tactic supposedly made use of by the Eisenhower administration in the first half of 1953. This policy of threatening nuclear war if the communists did not see sense worked, so the conventional account suggests, and it worked because NSC68 had so empowered American defensive capabilities. However, as we’ll see in this episode, Eisenhower’s tactic was neither completely successful nor was it unprecedented. In fact, to set the background by what we mean when we talk about atomic diplomacy, in this episode we’ll examine not Eisenhower’s, but Truman’s consistent approach to that weapon in diplomatic negotiations, while we also assess the general perspective of the political and military staffs of the early 1950s. The result is a surprising but also critically important set of take aways – not only was Truman unsuccessful in his efforts to bluster with the atomic bomb, he also learned from these failures, and refrained from threatening the communists from spring 1951. This gap enabled the Eisenhower administration, or more accurately John Foster Dulles, to claim that the new brand of atomic diplomacy was a great success, and played a leading role in ending the war. The truth, as we’ll learn, was far from so straightforward. ********* Music used: “Take Me Out To The Ball-game”, by the Hayden Quartet released in 1908. This classic should be familiar to everyone, even those like myself who don’t know what’s going on if they watch a baseball game! Available: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Hadyn_Quartet/Antique_Phonograph_Music_Program_04212015/Take_Me_Out_to_the_Ballgame_-_Hadyn_Quartet  SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 22, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Korean War #45: The Culminating Factors (media.mp3)

Our endless flurry of Korean War content continues as we pave the way towards the Versailles Anniversary Project! Stay tuned! Episode 45: The Culminating Factors brings several threads of our story together, as we count down towards the establishment of peace amidst the political climb of Dwight D. Eisenhower, who would be elected President of the US and wave goodbye to the Truman administration. The story of how Eisenhower got there, and why he decided that “I will go to Korea” is a fascinating one which we examine here. At the same time, we look at what the departing Truman administration meant for American foreign policy. Was Truman sad to leave, or did he believe that he had done his duty for American security, and left a lasting legacy on that office? In addition to examining these aspects of the story, we look as well at the coercive diplomacy used by Eisenhower. Was Eisenhower’s diplomatic approach, as the historical consensus suggests, sprinkled with several sticks and threats, in a bid to force the communists out of the war? A great deal of evidence exists to suggest that the Eisenhower administration did engage in a great deal of coercive, even nuclear, diplomacy, from 1953. However, while this does fit quite nicely with the idea that NSC68 made America more powerful and thus better positioned to actually lob threats at its rivals, we will see in future episodes that the reality is not so straightforward.  SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter

From When Diplomacy Fails Podcast on Oct. 22, 2018, 12:01 a.m.

Korean War #45: The Culminating Factors (media.mp3)

Our endless flurry of Korean War content continues as we pave the way towards the Versailles Anniversary Project! Stay tuned! Episode 45: The Culminating Factors brings several threads of our story together, as we count down towards the establishment of peace amidst the political climb of Dwight D. Eisenhower, who would be elected President of the US and wave goodbye to the Truman administration. The story of how Eisenhower got there, and why he decided that “I will go to Korea” is a fascinating one which we examine here. At the same time, we look at what the departing Truman administration meant for American foreign policy. Was Truman sad to leave, or did he believe that he had done his duty for American security, and left a lasting legacy on that office? In addition to examining these aspects of the story, we look as well at the coercive diplomacy used by Eisenhower. Was Eisenhower’s diplomatic approach, as the historical consensus suggests, sprinkled with several sticks and threats, in a bid to force the communists out of the war? A great deal of evidence exists to suggest that the Eisenhower administration did engage in a great deal of coercive, even nuclear, diplomacy, from 1953. However, while this does fit quite nicely with the idea that NSC68 made America more powerful and thus better positioned to actually lob threats at its rivals, we will see in future episodes that the reality is not so straightforward.  SPONSORS 1) Use the code WDF15 to get 15% off your stylish new pair of headphones/earphones/listening things 2) To access some fascinating books, nerd out with like minded enthusiasts, further your knowledge of some classical works, get 25% off your first three months AND help the show, head on over to onlinegreatbooks.com! Remember to BEFIT! B is for blog E is for email wdfpodcast@hotmail.com F is for Facebook, the Page and the Group I is for iTunes, please rate, review and subscribe T is for TELL ANYONE! 1) Pre-order our book on the Thirty Years War 2) Are you TeamFerdinand or TeamFrederick ? It's time to pick a side, and a t-shirt! 3) Don't forget of course to support WDF on Patreon to access ad-free episodes with the scripts attached, as well an hour of extra content every month, and so much more! - $1, $2 & $5 memberships available! 4) Of course, make sure you also follow us on Twitter, visit our website and sign up to our Newsletter